Use advanced navigation for a better experience.
You can quickly scroll through posts by pressing the above keyboard keys. Now press the button in right corner to close this window.

Lifting and dividing Hostas

Annie has had some great results with her gardening this year. However I still maintain that when it comes to hostas, I’m still in the lead – just! I don’t know if it is the richness of the Spalding soil or just my good fortune, but my hostas always seem to do well. As you can see from the picture my collection has grown quite large, so now it is time (autumn to spring) to lift them and divide, thus creating new additions and creating space for them to grow in.

According to the good people of Wikipedia Hosta is a genus of about 23–45 species of plants commonly known as hostas, plantain lilies (particularly in Britain) named after an Australian Botanist called Nicholas Thomas Host (1771-1834). The hosta is native to northeast Asia. It is a fantastic plant to grow in a shady area.

Original large Hosta

To divide them couldn’t be easier.  First dig up. Take a shovel and dig around the hosta (about 6 inches out. This will ensure you do not damage the roots. Some people like to cut off the leaves before taking out the hosta as it makes it easier to handle. I do it both ways dependent on size and if Annie is around to help me.

Hosta ready for dividing

Next comes the divide, don’t worry these are tough old boys so you don’t be frightened of having a go. Dependent again on size you can use a knife or spade. Cut through from top to bottom in clumps. One cluster you can then replant back in the original spot and the others can either be potted or put in new positions. Do make sure you water well and remember they take a little while to settle in so may not look as good as the original first off.  The photographs show one I did at the weekend which I have divided into three plants.

 Divided Hosta back in original position

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.

Planning the spring garden

It’s now the perfect time of the year to start thinking about planning our spring garden. Where do we start?   Well, we have to ask ourselves, ‘What do I want from my spri[...]

What’s Looking Good in June

The beautiful lilac blooms May-June. The purple clusters of Syringa vulgaris exude a wonderful fragrance. After such a long drawn out spring, it is such a joy to see our gardens[...]

Harvest your own vegetables

At the weekend we started our new project we erected a raised vegetable bed - just a small one to begin with to see how we get on. It’s surprising how much you can grow in one - or[...]

small_keyboard