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Indoor dried flowers

In the summer, we can enjoy the flowers in our garden. Now autumn is upon us and the weather is becoming wetter and colder outside.

Extend the summer feeling and move the flowers inside! Drying flowers you can do in many different ways. You can use tools such as silica gel, glycerin and a press, but below we describe the natural drying way. If you let flowers dry in the open air they will keep more of their shape and smell.

Getting started! 

Pick the flowers to dry when the weather is dry. You can do this best in the afternoon, because the dew than evaporates. Note the flowering: the best time is a few days before the flower reaches its maximum height.  Remove the leaves at the bottom of the flower stalks, and make small bunches of flowers. Bind them together with rope or raffia. You need to bind the bunches, not too tight, so there is still some air between them. Tip: tie with elastic, this ensures that the flower stems won’t shrink.
Hang the bunches upside down on a rack, for example on a drying rack. Give the rack a dry, cool, dark, well-ventilated location. If the location is wet the flowers can quickly rot, especially when the stalks are tied together.
Let the flowers dry for between 1 -8 weeks, depending on the flowers. If the stem snaps when you bend it the drying process is finished!

Suitable flowers and plants

Drying Flowers – Hydrangea ‘Invincibelle’

Hydrangea ‘Invincibelle’

There are many different flowers and plants that are suitable for drying. The most popular are roses and lavender. A few sprigs of lavender in a linen bag between your linen smells delicious! But lilies, hydrangeas, delphiniums and gypsophila are easy to dry. You can also use dahlias and cornflowers.
For added decoration you can use some leaves from the dried flowers. Dried fern-leaf combine well. As do twisted willow twigs and eucalyptus leaves.

Do you want large leaves like beech, maple and bamboo drying? Try this under a carpet or mattress.

Are you going to dry flowers?

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